John Deere Engine Serial Number

John Deere Engine | Highway & Heavy Parts

John Deere did not start by producing diesel engines. Instead, their first product was a self-scouring steel plow made in the 19th century, and it put John Deere on the map as a company. From there they expanded to other agricultural implements before becoming the machinery giant we know them as today.

If you run a Deere, and are looking for replacement parts, you'll need to know a few numbers to help ensure you get the right one for your engine. Below we discuss how to make sense of your engine serial number and where you might find it. Because each engine manufacturer has a unique way of numbering their engines, make sure you know where to find the information for yours!

 

Understanding Your Engine Serial Number

John Deere serial numbers are typically 13 characters long. The first two letters indicate which factory the engine was produced in:

  • TO (Dubuque, IA)
  • CD (Sarran, France)
  • PE (Torreon, Mexico)

The next four digits are for the engine model, followed by a letter for the emission code. Depending on the age of your engine, this code could indicate different things. For an older engine, this letter will actually stand for the aspiration code, and means the following:

  • D: Naturally Aspirated
  • T: Turbocharger
  • A: Turbocharged, air to coolant aftercooled
  • H: Turbocharged, air to air aftercooled
  • S: Turbocharged, air to sea water aftercooled

Newer engines, on the other hand, use this letter to indicate their emission certification, as follows:

  • B: Non-Certified
  • C, E, or F: Tier 1/Stage I emission certified
  • G, J, or K: Tier 2/Stage II emission certified
  • L, M, N, or P: Tier 3/Stage III emission certified

The last 6 digits are your serial number sequence.

Additionally, it would be helpful to know if your engine is a PowerTech or not. This is because while they have the same model designations as the Series 300, they need very different parts. There might be a sticker on your valve cover that lets you know if your engine is a PowerTech, but that may have come off during operation. Instead, take a look at the model number below the serial number on the engine serial number plate. This model number can help clue you in. If it ends with 150, 151, 180, 220, 250, 275, or above, then you have a PowerTech engine.

 

Where To Find Your John Deere Engine Serial Number

As I mentioned, you can locate your ESN on a plate in your engine. This tag is most frequently found attached to one side of the engine or another. In some situations, you might also want to have your casting numbers, which are on the engine block itself and the connecting rods. The more specific information you can find regarding your engine, the more sure you can be that you'll be purchasing the right parts.

 

The Importance of Your John Deere Engine Serial Number

Like with other engine serial numbers, this information is vital to ensure you're getting the right parts for your engine the first time. The issue with the PowerTech engines shows why a model number isn't always sufficient. If you didn't know the difference, you could be buying parts that just won't work—costing you precious time and money.

By having your engine serial number on hand, though, our techs can look up your engine and make sure the parts you're requesting will work for your engine. Online, too, you might notice a box that asks you to input your ESN. This helps us to process your order more quickly. If you don't fill out the field, we will contact you to verify the information and make sure you're getting what you need.

Need help with your John Deere engine? We're here for you! Call a certified tech at 844-215-3406, or request a quote online. We'll get you the diesel engine parts you need!